Sunday, June 25, 2017

Garden Update: Summer



It's been a while since I've posted one of my Garden Updates. We're about due!  Despite the extreme, up-and-down weather we've had so far this year, the garden is doing pretty well.  Most of what's been planted is coming in.  Most, but not all. It also looks like we're losing the collards to an as yet unidentified critter.  As for the kale, it just never came in at all.  The tomatoes, which were started inside early in the year, mostly didn't make it through transplanting.  I believe we ended up with two plants.  Those two plants are thriving, though!

We have three or four surprise lettuce plants (top left in the collage, below,) and they look delicious!  I can't wait to harvest them!  The largest one, I believe, is a seed plant. We also have garlic coming in gangbusters, as well as two potato plants, which are doing well.  My corn is doing well so far, but in thinning out my plants, I fear I may have thinned too much.  I think the plants are fine, but I may not end up with as much corn as I had hoped.  A few did not come up, but I'm learning that this is normal.  This is why we "over plant."

The garden is huge, and all of the beds are not even in yet, but we are already growing quite a variety of foods--all things we will actually eat, of course. After my partner did some research, we decided to use the no till method for laying in our garden. In our case, the process is even simpler than what larger farms do:  We simply laid down grass mulch over the tops of our beds and dug the seeds in by hand. That's it.  We still have weeds, but they haven't overrun everything, and weeding doesn't take long.  (Though in the case of the dandelion, we're leaving some of it in place, because we eat it.) We will need to rotate our crops from year to year, but there's no need to leave a bed fallow, as some people do. Not only is this better for the soil--it is also saving us a lot of time, and with both of our various chronic health issues, it has made the process a lot easier.  The plants we have coming in are very healthy.  It helps that, before we moved in here, my parents had not put any chemicals on the lawn for several years.

As always, we use no chemicals or fertilizers--other than compost--on our garden.  Over the years, our yields have been fine for our needs.  Heck, last year, we weren't able to eat all of the tomatoes we harvested! I feel like in using this no till method, we are reducing our footprint just a little bit more, and that's a good thing!


(Other stuff)

The candles in the middle of the bottom row have nothing to do with our garden.  LOL!  That is one of my recycled art projects!  It was my first attempt at making votive candles (from recycled wax,) and I was about 90% successful.  I lost one to maker's error.  I'll just remelt it and use in in the next batch! Candles and incense are both items I have been making on and off for years. I had stopped for several years, because I simply did not really have the space to do either one on the scale I prefer.  Now, I have the space and the resources to do it.  It is my hope to start selling them. I'm even hoping to eventually sell some of our sage, but that is a long way off, because, though it is doing well, our sage plants are mere teeny, tiny babies at this point.

The photo in the lower left corner is of the entrance into the woods where our pet cemetery (I'm calling it "Sage's Rest") will eventually be.  The kitty statue is staying, and I'm making a sign.  Over time, I will be clearing out the space, and as our pets pass on, this is where we will bury them. This is where we buried my dear Musashi.  It may seem a bit morbid to pick out a space for a cemetery, but it's all a part of life.

I'll be sure to update later in the year, when we start to see how our yields are! Meanwhile, happy summer!

No comments: